Politics, Traditionalism

Is Free Speech the Right Battle?

is-free-speech-the-right-batteAbout a week ago, the University of California Berkeley was set ablaze in protest of invited speaker Milo Yiannopoulos. These riotous reactions are a hallmark of political groups in disagreement with those individuals aligning with the contemporary “right-wing.” The ongoing conflict between these opposing factions of liberalism has been framed as a battle concerning the freedom of speech. With battle lines being drawn as such, it can be understood that the left opposes free speech and the right champions it as a fundamental pillar of Western values.

Structuring the conflict in this way, however, ignores the secularist infighting embedded in the context of the disagreement. This isn’t an issue of left vs. right, if by left and right it is meant that these two political factions are diametrically opposed to one another in their cultural interaction. In reality, these two groups are fighting over who will get to define the political parameters secular liberalism is most identified; right-wing version or a left-wing version.

In my view, this continued battle between right-wing liberals and leftist regressive revolutionaries around the issue of “free speech” ultimately results in a distracted defamation of what the actual fight is all about.

This isn’t a conflict between who believes the most in free speech and who does not. Treating spiritual warfare in this way places the battle within the context of the most flimsy of premises.

The real battle is between the demonic, anti-logos, regressive revolutionaries (including both right and left factions), and the Logos centered Church carrying the Gospel message to every creature.

I for one do not wake up in the morning motivated to defend Milo’s alleged right to openly discuss his deviant sexual practices in order to trigger “snowflakes” on college campuses. And honestly, one of the most ridiculous slogans championed by every liberal faction imaginable, and is met with immediate seal-like clapping, is the, “I may not agree with what you say but I will fight to the death to defend your right to say it” mantra. Really? You will fight to the death for SJW’s to shout abject lies about almost every topic in which they speak? If this is something that is supposed to be worth fighting for, then I suggest a reevaluation of your values.

Moreover, the “fight to the death” claim doesn’t amount to actually taking up arms to defend this alleged right. No true warrior could ever be motivated by something as puerile as this alleged pillar of Western values.

The traditionalist transcends these politically immature spats between factions of anti-logos miscreants, and is inspired by the mission given to us by our Master – the Great Commission.

We are called to baptize the nations. No Apostle cared about he speech codes of Rome. St. Peter didn’t worry about a universal right to speak before he preached at Pentecost. Nowhere in the Scriptures do we see the Apostles fighting for, or claim that, Rome is infringing on their right to say whatever they want to because they simply exist with the capacity to use language.

The Apostles preached truth no matter the consequences.

They were focused on something much larger than “rights to free speech”, and they were willing to die for it.

It is important to remember that the phrase, “Jesus is Lord”, was loaded with controversy because it proclaimed contrary to the cultural narrative that Caesar is lord. This simple statement meant that Caesar is not God, and that he owed his allegiance to the true King Jesus Christ.

Traditionalists recognize that our mission is much bigger than the childish infighting between conservative liberals, classical liberals, and progressive liberals.

The Great Commission proclaims the truth of a reigning King. And if there is something our culture needs to hear right now it is this – Christus vincit, Christus regnat, Christus imperat.

 

– Lucas G. Westman

 

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