Whose War in Syria?

WW I CasualtiesIn 2003, Pat Buchanan wrote a seminal article identifying the modus operandi of neoconservatives that had taken over the Republican Party. By doing so Buchanan recognized in great detail the aim of neoconservative foreign policy to use America’s military power to fight wars all over the globe that have nothing to do with the defense of our nation. These wars are launched at the behest of Israel and informed by the political ideology broadcasted by AIPAC controlled politicians.

Nothing has changed since this article was published 15 years ago. Neocons still control the mainstream foreign policy discourse. And if anyone dares to call out these anti-logos revolutionaries for their destructive tendencies a myriad of political platitudes, thematic pseudo-moralism, and American exceptionalist catch-phrases are thrown around to stifle the truth from coming to light.

“Whose War?” was written 15 years ago, and nothing has changed since its publication. Well, actually, that is not entirely accurate, the neocon foreign policy has proved itself to be a complete and total failure.

As of now Tucker Carlson is a lone voice in the media warning against another intervention in the Middle East:

And because Carlson is actually asking questions probing the wisdom of blindly continuing down the path of perpetual intervention and war, he is being smeared by neocons for simply dissenting from their sage advice on how to handle international diplomacy:

Before highlighting Buchanan’s article, let’s consider the insight of Brigadier General Smedley D. Butler, from his influential book War is a Racket:

“War is a racket. It always has been. It is possibly the oldest, easily the most profitable, surely the most vicious. It is the only one international in scope. It is the only one in which the profits are reckoned in dollars and the losses in lives.

A racket is best described, I believe, as something that is not what it seems to the majority of people. Only a small ‘inside’ group knows what it is about. It is conducted for the benefit of the very few, at the expense of the very many. Out of war a few people make huge fortunes.

In the World War a mere handful garnered the profits of the conflict. At least 21,000 new millionaires and billionaires were made in the United States during the World War. That many admitted their huge blood gains in the their income tax returns. How many other war millionaires falsified their income tax returns no one knows.

How many of these war millionaires shouldered a rifle? How many of them dug a trench? How many of them knew what is meant to go hungry in a rat-infested dugout? How many of them spent sleepless, frightened nights, ducking shells and shrapnel and machine gun bullets? How many of them parried the bayonet thrust of an enemy? How many of them were wounded or killed in battle?

Out of war nations acquire additional territory, if they are victorious. They just take it. This newly acquired territory promptly is exploited by the few – the self-same few who wrung dollars out of blood in the war. The general public shoulders the bill.

And what is this bill?

This bill renders a horrible accounting. Newly placed gravestones. Mangled bodies. Shattered minds. Broken hearts and homes. Economic instability. Depression and all its attendant miseries. Back-breaking taxation for generations and generations.

For a great many years, as a soldier, I had a suspicion that war was a racket; not until I retired to civil life did I fully realize it. Now that I see the international war clouds again gathering, as they are today, I must face it and speak out.”

From the article Whose War?:

The Neoconservatives

Who are the neoconservatives? The first generation were ex-liberals, socialists, and Trotskyites, boat-people from the McGovern revolution who rafted over to the GOP at the end of conservatism’s long march to power with Ronald Reagan in 1980.

A neoconservative, wrote Kevin Phillips back then, is more likely to be a magazine editor than a bricklayer. Today, he or she is more likely to be a resident scholar at a public policy institute such as the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) or one of its clones like the Center for Security Policy or the Jewish Institute for National Security Affairs (JINSA). As one wag writes, a neocon is more familiar with the inside of a think tank than an Abrams tank.

Almost none came out of the business world or military, and few if any came out of the Goldwater campaign. The heroes they invoke are Woodrow Wilson, FDR, Harry Truman, Martin Luther King, and Democratic Senators Henry “Scoop” Jackson (Wash.) and Pat Moynihan (N.Y.).

All are interventionists who regard Stakhanovite support of Israel as a defining characteristic of their breed. Among their luminaries are Jeane Kirkpatrick, Bill Bennett, Michael Novak, and James Q. Wilson.

Their publications include the Weekly Standard, Commentary, the New Republic, National Review, and the editorial page of the Wall Street Journal. Though few in number, they wield disproportionate power through control of the conservative foundations and magazines, through their syndicated columns, and by attaching themselves to men of power.


 

– Lucas G. Westman

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