Apologetics, Pope Saint Pius X, Theology, Traditionalism

Pope Saint Pius X: Pascendi Dominici Gregis

– Pope St. Pius X – Pascendi Dominici Gregis –

Pope Saint Pius X - PascendiThe Modernist as Apologist

35. The Modernist apologist depends in two ways on the philosopher. First, indirectly, inasmuch as his subject-matter is history – history dictated, as we have seen, by the philosopher; and, secondly, directly, inasmuch as he takes both his doctrines and his conclusions from the philosopher. Hence that common axiom of the Modernist school that in the new apologetics controversies in religion must be determined by psychological and historical research. The Modernist apologists, the, enter the arena, proclaiming to the rationalists that, though they are defending religion, they have no intention of employing the data of the sacred books or the histories in current use in the Church, and written upon the old lines, but real history composed on modern principles and according to the modern method. In all this they assert that they are not using an argumentation ad hominem, because they are really of the opinion that the truth is to be found only in this kind of history. They feel that it is not necessary for them to make profession of their own sincerity in their writings. They are already known to and praised by the rationalists as fighting under the same banner, and they not only plume themselves on these encomiums, which would only provoke disgust in a real Catholic, but use them as a counter-compensation to the reprimands of the Church.

Modernist Apologetic Methodology

Let us see how the Modernist conducts his apologetics. The aim he sets before himself is to make one who is still without faith attain that experience of the Catholic religion which, according to the system, is the sole basis of faith. There are two ways open to him, the objective and the subjective. The first of them starts from agnosticism. It tends to show that religion, and especially the Catholic religion, is endowed with such vitality as to compel every psychologist and historian of good faith to recognize that its history hides some element of the unknown. To this end it is necessary to prove that the Catholic religion, as it exists today, is that which has founded by Jesus Christ; that is to say, that it is nothing else than the progressive development of the germ which He brought into the world. Hence it is imperative first of all to establish what this germ was, and this the Modernist claims to be able to do by the following formula: Christ announced the coming of the Kingdom of God, which was to be realized within a brief lapse of time and of which He was to become the Messias, the divinely-given founder and ruler. Then it must be shown how this germ, always immanent and permanent in the Catholic religion, has gone on slowly developing in the course of history, adapting itself successively to the different circumstances through which it has passed, borrowing from them by vital assimilation all the doctrinal, cultural, ecclesiastical forms that served its purpose; while, on the other hand, it surmounted all obstacles, vanquished all enemies, and survived all assaults and all combats. Anyone who well and duly considers this mass of obstacles, adversaries, attacks, combats, and the vitality and fecundity which the Church has shown throughout them all, must admit that if the laws of evolution are visible in her life they fail to explain the whole of her history – the unknown rises forth from it and presents itself before us. Thus do they argue, not perceiving that their determination of the primitive germ is only an a priori assumption of agnostic and evolutionist philosophy, and that the germ itself has been gratuitously defined so that it may fit in with their contention.


 

– Lucas G. Westman

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Catechism, Pope Saint Pius X, Saints, Theology

Catechism of Pope St. Pius X: The First Article of the Creed – God The Father Almighty

Pope St. Pius X PortraitThe First Article of the Creed

God The Father Almighty

 

Q. What does the First Article of the Creed: I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, teach us?

A. The First Article of the Creed Teaches us that there is one God, and only one; that He is omnipotent and has created heaven and earth and all things contained in them, that is to say, the whole Universe.

Q. How do we know that there is a God?

A. We know that there is a God because reason proves it and faith confirms it.

Q. Why do we call God the Father?

A. We call God the Father because by nature He is the Father of the Second Person of the Blessed Trinity, that is to say, of the Son, begotten of Him; because God is the Father of all men, whom He has created and whom He preserves and governs; finally, because by grace He is the Father of all good Christians, who are hence called the adopted sons of God.

Q. Why is the Father the First Person of the Blessed Trinity?

A. The Father is the First Person of the Blessed Trinity, because He does not proceed from any other Person, but is the Principle of the other two Persons, that is, of the Son and of the Holy Ghost.

Q. What is meant by the word Omnipotent?

A. The word Omnipotent means that God can do all that He wills.

Q. God can neither sin nor die, how then do we say He can do all things?

A. Though He can neither sin nor die, we say God can do all things, because to be able to sin or die is not an effect of power, but of weakness which cannot exist in God who is most perfect.

Catechism of Pope St. Pius X: Preliminary Lesson – On Christian Doctrine And Its Principal Parts

Catechism of Pope St. Pius X: The Apostles Creed in General

 

– Lucas G. Westman

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Catechism, Pope Saint Pius X, Saints, Theology

Catechism of Pope St. Pius X: The Apostle’s Creed in General

The Twelve ApostlesThe Apostle’s Creed

The Creed in General

Q. What is the first part of Christian Doctrine?

A. The first part of Christian Doctrine is the Symbol of the Apostles, commonly called the Creed.

Q. Why do you call the Creed the Symbol of the Apostles?

A. The Creed is called the Symbol of the Apostles because it is a summary of the truths of faith taught by the Apostles.

Q. How many articles are there in the Creed?

A. There are twelve articles in the Creed.

Q. Recite them.

A. (1) I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth; (2) And in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord; (3) Who was conceived by the Holy Ghost; born of the Virgin Mary; (4) Suffered under Pontius Pilate: was crucified, died, and buried; (5) He descended into hell: the third day He rose again from the dead; (6) he ascended into Heaven: sitteth at the right hand of God the Father Almighty; (7) From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. (8) I believe in the Holy Ghost; (9) The Holy Catholic Church; the Communion of Saints; (10) The forgiveness of sins; (11) The resurrection of the body; (12) Life everlasting. Amen.

Q. What is meant by the word: “I believe”, which you say at the beginning of the Symbol?

A. The word: I believe, means I hold everything that is contained in these twelve articles to be perfectly true; and I believe these truths more firmly than if I saw them with my eyes, because God, who can neither deceive nor be deceived, has revealed them to the Holy Catholic Church and through this Church to us.

Q. What do the articles of the Creed contain?

A. The articles of the Creed contain the principal truths to be believed concerning God, Jesus Christ, and the Church, His Spouse.

Q. Is it useful to recite the Creed frequently?

A. It is most useful to recite the Creed frequently, so as to impress the truths of faith more and more deeply on our hearts.

Catechism of Pope St. Pius X: Preliminary Lesson – On Christian Doctrine and its Principal Parts

 

– Lucas G. Westman

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Catechism, Pope Saint Pius X, Saints, Theology

Catechism of Pope St. Pius X: Preliminary Lesson – On Christian Doctrine and its Principal Parts

Catechism of Pope Saint Pius XCatechism of Pope St. Pius X: Preliminary Lesson – On Christian Doctrine and its Principal Parts

Q. Are you a Christian?

A. Yes, I am a Christian, by the grace of God.

 

Q. Why do you say: By the grace of God?

A. I say: By the grace of God, because to be a Christian is a perfectly gratuitous gift of God, which we ourselves could not have merited.

 

Q. Who is a true Christian?

A. A true Christian is he who is baptized, who believes and professes the Christian Doctrine, and obeys the lawful pastors of the Church.

 

Q. What is Christian Doctrine?

A. Christian doctrine is the doctrine which Jesus Christ our Lord taught us to show us the way of salvation.

 

Q. Is it necessary to learn the doctrine taught by Jesus Christ?

A. It certainly is necessary to learn the doctrine taught by Jesus Christ, and those who fail to do so are guilty of a grave breach of duty.

 

Q. Are parents and guardians bound to send their children and those dependent on them to catechism?

A. Parents and guardians are bound to see that their children and dependents learn Christian Doctrine, and they are guilty before God if they neglect this duty.

 

Q. From whom are we to receive and learn Christian Doctrine?

A. We are to receive and learn Christian Doctrine from the Holy Catholic Church.

 

Q. How are we certain that the Christian Doctrine which we receive from the Holy Catholic Church is really true?

A. We are certain that the doctrine which we receive from the Holy Catholic Church is true, because Jesus Christ, the divine Author of this doctrine, committed it through His Apostles to the Church, which he founded and made the infallible teacher of all men, promising her His divine assistance until the end of time.

 

Q. Are there proofs of the truth of Christian Doctrine?

A. The truth of Christian Doctrine is also shown by the eminent sanctity of number who have professed it and who still profess it, by the heroic fortitude of the martyrs, by its marvelous and rapid propagation in the world, and by its perfect preservation throughout so many centuries of ceaseless and varied struggles.

 

Q. What and how many are the principal and most necessary parts of Christian Doctrine?

A. The principal and most necessary parts of Christian Doctrine are four The Creed, The Our Father, The Commandments, and The Sacraments.

 

Q. What does the Creed teach us?

A. The Creed teaches us the principal articles of our holy faith.

 

Q. What does the Our Father teach us?

A. The Our Father teaches us all that we are to hope from God, and all we are to ask of Him.

 

Q. What do the Commandments teach us?

A. The Commandments teach us all that we are to do to please God – all of which is summed up in loving God above all things and our neighbor as ourselves for the love of God.

 

Q. What does the doctrine of the Sacraments teach us?

A. The doctrine of the Sacraments shows us the nature and right use of those means which Jesus Christ has instituted to remit our sins, give us His grace, infuse into and increase in us the virtues of the faith, hope, and charity.

 

– Lucas G. Westman

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