The Growing Philosophical Influence of Edward Feser, Thomism, & Neo-Scholasticism

During my time in RCIA I spend many hours discussing philosophy and theology with a great priest named Fr. Joseph. At one point in the conversation we were discussing the issues surrounding modern atheism and in this context he recommended that I read a book titled, The Last Superstition, by Edward Feser. I had no … Continue reading The Growing Philosophical Influence of Edward Feser, Thomism, & Neo-Scholasticism

The Aristotelian Argument for the Existence of God

Although atheism still exists as a basic presupposition of our modernistic culture, its credibility has been thoroughly exposed as fatuous. The new atheism of our current era has had its intellectual legs cut out from underneath it, and in actuality, has been demonstrated to be an illusory superstition from the very outset of its opportunistic … Continue reading The Aristotelian Argument for the Existence of God

Saint Thomas Aquinas on Creation

The Connection Between the Following Considerations and the Preceding Ones “I meditated upon all Thy works: I mediated upon the works of Thy hands” (Ps. 142.5). [1] Of no thing whatever can a perfect knowledge be obtained unless its operation is known, because the measure and quality of a thing’s power is judged from the … Continue reading Saint Thomas Aquinas on Creation

Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange on the Point of Culmination

Point of Culmination "This point is found in the idea of self-subsistent being. This idea unifies the five ways as a common keystone unifies five arches. Five attributes appear, one at the end of each way, in ascending order thus: first mover of the universe, corporeal and spiritual, first efficient cause, first necessary being, supreme … Continue reading Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange on the Point of Culmination

Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange on the Fundamental Validity of the Five Ways

Fundamental Validity of the Five Ways “All these proofs rest on the principle of causality: Anything that exists, if it does not exist of itself, depends in last analysis on something that does exist of itself. To deny this principle leads to absurdity. To say “a thing contingent, that is, a thing which of itself … Continue reading Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange on the Fundamental Validity of the Five Ways

Aquinas’s Five Ways & Biblical Commentary

I recently stumbled upon this section of an essay by Fr. Cornelio Fabro titled, The Proofs of the Existence of God, where he identifies a "complement to the five ways" in Aquinas’s biblical commentary on the Gospel of St. John. “4. Critical Note on the Five Ways The criticisms inspired by modern thought, though perhaps easier to … Continue reading Aquinas’s Five Ways & Biblical Commentary

Natural Theology & the Thomistic Synthesis

Natural Theology That which is, is more than that which can be, more than that which is on the road to be. This principle led Aristotle and Aquinas to find, at the summit of all reality, pure act, understanding of understanding, sovereign and good. But Aquinas rises above Aristotle and Leibnitz, for whom the world … Continue reading Natural Theology & the Thomistic Synthesis

Catholic Theology & Philosophical Foundations

"As we will see, Pope John Paul II, in his encyclical Fides et ratio strenuously upholds the tradition of giving priority to faith in the question of the relationship between faith and reason. To do otherwise, of course, would be to flirt with rationalism. Faith, however, must be understood; it is always, to borrow from … Continue reading Catholic Theology & Philosophical Foundations

The Sacred Monster of Strict-Observance Thomism

Strict-Observance Thomism The first chapter of Helen James John’s The Thomist Spectrum is entitled “Garrigou-Lagrange and Strict-Observance Thomism.” She notes that the qualifier “strict-observance” was coined in “a half-joking fashion many years ago, but has now become a standard way of speaking about the Thomism taught in the Roman universities up to the Second Vatican … Continue reading The Sacred Monster of Strict-Observance Thomism

Pope Leo XIII on Saint Thomas Aquinas – Aeterni Patris

Taken From the Encyclical - Aeterni Patris: 17. Among the Scholastic Doctors, the chief and master of all towers Thomas Aquinas, who, as Cajetan observes, because "he most venerated the ancient Doctors of the Church, in a certain way seems to have inherited the intellect of all."[34] The doctrines of those illustrious men, like the … Continue reading Pope Leo XIII on Saint Thomas Aquinas – Aeterni Patris